How are African academics being impacted by the pandemic?

That’s the focus of a new research briefing from the Mawazo Institute.  The project team surveyed over 500 academics, mostly from East Africa, about whether the pandemic had disrupted their research and teaching.  The vast majority said they were experiencing interruptions to their courses and research, while less than 40% said that e-learning was being offered by their institutions.  Combine this with concerns about already-low research output across the continent, and it’s going to be a difficult year for the higher education and research sectors.

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Vote for the Mawazo Institute for “Best Kenyan NGO on Gender Equality”

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We’re happy to share that the Mawazo Institute has been nominated for the National Diversity and Inclusion Awards and Recognition by the Daima Trust!  We’ve been recognized as one of the best NGOs on gender equality in Kenya.

Could you please take a few seconds to vote for us to win the award?  Voting is open until February 28.  And while you’re at it, check out the long list of other inspiring Kenyan NGOs which have been recognized!

Support the Mawazo Institute this Giving Tuesday

The hashtag Giving Tuesday

Today is Giving Tuesday, and I’d love to ask all my readers to consider supporting the Mawazo Institute.  From 2018 – 2019, we provided over $40,000 in research grants to rising female scholars from East Africa, like Peris Ambala of Kenyatta University.  With support from our PhD Scholars program, Peris pursued her research on the spread of Ebola-type viruses across East Africa, seeking to determine whether the virus had traveled from the DRC to Kenya.  Our whole Nairobi office was relieved to hear her conclusion that the virus isn’t present in Kenya at the moment!

A Kenyan woman in a white lab coat and blue gloves scrapes a sample off a microscope slide
Peris at work in the lab

Even a small donation can go a long way in helping us support up-and-coming female scholars across East Africa.  For example, you could cover:

  • Travel costs to collect data in rural areas ($25)
  • Basic scientific equipment like sterile gloves and pipettes ($50)
  • Statistical software for data analysis ($100)
  • Three-day training workshop on research methods ($200)

You can donate by credit card or M-Pesa at our donation page.  Mawazo is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, and all donations are tax-deductible for US donors.  We’re so grateful for all your support!

 

Africa Update for November 2019

Here’s the latest edition of Africa Update.  We’ve got a new metro system in Abidjan, culinary imperialism in Kenya, plans to refill Lake Chad with a giant canal, how hospitals in Malawi are getting men to do more housework, and more.

A view of Nairobi with Karura Forest in the foreground

A stunning view of Nairobi, via Kenyapics

West Africa: Follow 5 young Nigerian journalists as they travel across 14 West African countries along the Jollof Road.  In Nigeria, former members of Boko Haram and ISIS trafficking survivors have found it very difficult to re-integrate into civilian society.  Hundreds of children, some as young as 5, have been arrested by the Nigerian police on suspicion of involvement with Boko Haram.  Abidjan is getting a metro system.  A new policy that lets cocoa farmers plant in “degraded” forests could lead to widespread deforestation in Côte d’Ivoire.  This is a great resource on the history of West Africa at a glance.

Central Africa:  This was a thoughtful piece about breaking the cycle of motorcycle theft and violent retribution in the CAR.  Members of opposition parties are regularly being killed in Rwanda, although no one wants to point a finger directly at the government.  Rwanda is also getting a new nuclear research reactor with support from Russia.  The Uganda Law Society has released a new app meant to connect women and girls to legal advice.  LGBT+ rights are under threat again in Uganda, with discussion of another law to make gay sex punishable by death.  Check out this incredible mixed media piece about one family’s experience becoming refugees after the Congo Wars of the 1990s.

A cartoon showing a Chinese dragon scaring the crane and impala away from the Ugandan national crest

Here’s Atukwasize ChrisOgon‘s take on Chinese investment in Uganda

East Africa: In Kenya, the urban middle class is increasingly turning to “telephone farming” to diversify their income streams.  Here’s a wonderful piece about khat and precolonial cuisine in Kenya.  See also this piece about the history of culinary imperialism in Kenya.  Meet the the Jehovah’s Witnesses targeting Chinese immigrants in Kenya.  This is a good overview of Ethiopia’s complicated ethnic and regional politics.  There’s an ambitious plan to refill Lake Chad by piping water in from the DRC via the CAR.

Southern Africa: A novel campaign strategy has been spotted in Botswana, where the opposition handed out menstrual pads with the party logo on them.  This was a heartbreaking piece about sexual violence in South Africa and the #AmINext movement.  Check out this photo essay on the mine-clearing women of Angola.  Here’s an insightful long read about what really happened to the billions of dollars that were to be spent on Angola’s post-war reconstruction.  Why is Zambia planning to finance almost 10% of its 2020 budget through a mysterious “exceptional revenue” source?

Sunset on a beach, with a boat and a person in the foreground

Kismayo sunset, by Said Fadhaye

Gender: Meet Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, the first female mayor of Freetown, Sierra Leone.  Roughly 1/3 of African businesses have no women on their boards, and another 1/ 3 have only one woman.  In Malawi, a program which gives pregnant women housing close to hospitals before they deliver their babies has increased their husbands’ housework commitments while they’re away.  This is a remarkable portrait of three generations of women who have stood up to dictatorship in Sudan.  Kenya’s Gladys Ngetich is breaking barriers about women in STEM with her PhD on improving the efficiency of jet engines.

Business: This is a must-read piece on the political economy of foreign start-ups in Kenya.  Orange is developing a new feature phone for the African market which includes social media apps.  Uber is launching boat taxis in Lagos.  Africa has 15% of the world’s population, but fully 45% of the world’s mobile money activity.  African cosmetics companies are getting acquired by international corporations which want to offer better products for black skin and hair.  Check out my Mawazo co-founder Rose Mutiso’s TED talk on how to bring affordable electricity to Africa.

Maps showing that there appears to be much more poverty in Africa when it's measured at the district level rather than the country level

The geographic distribution of wealth in Africa looks very different depending on whether it’s measured at the country, province, or district level (via Marshall Burke)

Politics:  Africa Check has a great Promise Trackers page checking on the campaign promises of ruling parties in Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa.  In many African countries, political parties aren’t obliged to disclose private donations, in an area ripe for campaign finance reform.  In Ghana, the “I Am Aware” project successfully helped people push their local governments to improve the quality of public services like sanitation.  More than 45% of African citizens live in a country where the last census was done more than 10 years ago.  It turns out that most of Africa’s “civil wars” are actually regional wars.

Public health: Dr Jean-Jacques Muyembe of the DRC discovered Ebola in the 1970s, but has been largely written out of the historical record, until now.  Check out this incredible photo essay about Ebola first responders in eastern DRC. Also in the DRC, snakebites are an underdiscussed public health crisis. A new study finds that more than 40% of women are verbally or physically abused while giving birth in Ghana, Guinea and Nigeria.  Here’s how toxic masculinity can lead to the spread of HIV in Uganda.

A colorful portrait of a man and a woman on a red and pink printed background

Don’t miss Bisa Butler’s inspiring portraits of Black Americans done in African fabrics

Art + culture: A Togolese vintage clothing dealer is making waves in France by re-importing cast-off clothing previously sent to Togo.  Meet Kenyan sculptor Wangechi Mutu, who’s taking over the façade of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York until January 2020.  What can be done about the spike in fake South African art?  Check out the first print issue of Cameroon-based Bawka Magazine, about travel stories.  Let’s celebrate these six inspiring young climate activists from low income countries, including Kenya and Uganda.  Learn about all the unusual ways that African countries got their names.  Here are the rising female artists of Kampala.

Supporting African scholars in the social sciences

A rather overgrown sign at the University of Ghana, pointing towards the departments of math, computer sciences, and statistics

University of Ghana, Legon

Constantine Manda and I have a new piece out at the Center for Effective Global Action summarizing our remarks at our recent APSA panel on higher education in Africa (along with Leonard Wantchekon).  We concluded:

Programs like EASST are one step towards a dynamic African research ecosystem, but larger entities must follow their example. African governments and aid donors must commit to allocating more funding to universities and academic research. They can be held accountable in this by stronger academic professional associations within African countries, such as the African Studies Association of Africa. Deeper investments in African scholars will pay off in the form of high quality, intellectually diverse research on the issues affecting the continent today.